CANNABIS +
MENTAL HEALTH
EDUCATION

all science based info all the time

GUIDE
FAQ

Cannabis otherwise known as marijuana, weed, pot, grass, and more is part of the Cannabaceae plant family that is used for medicinal purposes or as a recreational drug. The cannabis stavita L plant originated in the Himalayas, and include three different subspecies: cannabis staiva is tall and thin, cannabis indica is short and bushy, and cannabis ruderalis short and stalky. The effects of the chemical compounds used to be fairly consistant by subspecies. However with genetic engineering over the years this no longer hold up. Cannabis yields a wide variety of colorful crystalized buds. It als has a pungent aromas- sometimes fruity and other time skunky scented. Cannabis contain over 500 chemical compounds are are proving to balance out each other and you, too.

The short answer- Yes! Absolutely! However cannabis is still classified as a Schedule I controlled substance under the Control Substance Act- categoring it as having “no currently accepted medical use in the United States, a lack of accepted safetyfor use under medical supervision, and a hugh potential for abuse.”

Despite this, there is evidence that supports cannabis used as a medicine. The National Institute on Drug Abuse notes various methods in which cannabis can be employed to help certain health related implications. FDA has also approved the pharmceutical drug Epidiolex which is the first drug comprised of cannabidiol- an active ingredient derived from cannabis to treat epilepsy in children.

It can be! There do exist risks for overuse and abuse of cannabis, and the potential to become addicted or dependent on it. However, this does not mean that anyone and everyone who touches cannabis will become addicted to it. In fact, there are quite a variety of factors that contribute to the reasons people get hooked on cannabis and cannot seem to stop, even if it interferes with daily activities or needs. Genetics, age, co-occuring disorders, trauma, family and social support are contributing factors that might determine underlying causes of addiction to cannabis.

According to the official CDC website, it is very unlikely to have a fatal overdose when using cannabis. However, just because an overdose is unlikely to happen, does not mean it is completely harmless. Responsible use is a very important factor and there are risks associated with cannabis use. Some side effects of using too much can include: anxiety, confusion, paranoia, accelerated heartbeat, hallucinations and potential nausea and vomiting.

This question can also be asked as “is cannabis a gateway drug?”, and the answer is not as simple as you may think. This cannot be answered with a simple “yes” or an easy “no”, because you first must look at and understand the facts presented to you.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the majority of people who use cannabis and only cannabis usually do not go on to take other forms of drugs, or ones that may be deemed “harder” substances. Those who do go on to take “harder” substances may show that their cannabis use preceded other drug usage. This may be explained by the hypothesis that people who are more vulnerable to using illicit substances may start with drugs that are readily available, such as cannabis, nicotine, and alcohol. As social interactions and usage history changes, one’s drug of choice may also alter.

Due to this, it is important to take into consideration one’s biological makeup and genetic history. You should ask yourself whether there is a history of drug usage in the family, as well as other biological factors that may come into play.

There is limited research on whether withdrawal symptoms are present in patients utilizing medical cannabis. One study concluded that 47% of people experience withdrawal symptoms from cannabis use.

Researchers continue to debate the potential for negative medicating cycles- meaning withdrawal symptoms present similarly to mental health symptoms. Therefore patients often misinterpreted their experience of withdrawal – believing it’s anxiety or depression. It may be common that patients then treat their perceived mental health- that’s actually withdrawal- with more cannabis.

Symptoms of withdrawal may include:

• aggression

• anger

• irritability

• sleep disturbance

• changes in appetite

• depressed mood

• restlessness

• headaches

• vomiting

• abdominal pain

Be sure to consult with your prescribing doctor if you have any concerns for your withdrawal and mental health symptoms.

POSTS
state-by-state qualifying conditions
GUIDE
FAQ

CBD is a naturally occuring chemical compound in all Cannabis Sativa L plants- which includes cannabis and hemp. While products and results vary, there has been a growing interest in this chemcial compound as many users report a greater sense of calmness, decreased appeitite, improved sleep, and more…

A major misconception about CBD is that it is legal in all 50 states- this is not true. CBD is legal federally but each state can make their own laws regarding CBD. CBD legalization laws vary state by state. CBD remains completely illegal in the following states: Idaho, Nebraska, and South Dakota. Be sure to check the laws in your state.

CBD is not intoxicating. However it is psychoactive and psychotropic; it causes changes in an individual’s thoughts and behavior as well as alters brain function temporarily. When used properly, it does not get you high.

CBD interacts with the body’s endocannabinoid system- helping us to help us maintain homeostasis or balance. CBD affects the body’s endocannabinoid receptors, causing the body to use more of its own naturally produced endocannabinoids to find physiological equilibrium.

There are four types of CBD you will find on the market including:

• full spectrum – includes all cannabinoid present in cannabis and hemp plants.

• broad spectrum – contains all the elements of the plant EXCEPT delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

• isolate – is only CBD that has been isolated or separated from all the other cannabinoids

• terpsolate – is CBD mixed with a terpene.

These distinctions are important based on intended use regarding the treatment of certain conditions and drug testing.

Workplace drug screening tests are very common nowadays, and is usually tested through a urine sample. Employers typically are looking for drugs that are reported to impair judgement or motor skills, such as amphetamines and opiates. CBD in itself is not one of the chemicals that employers are testing for, as there are no reports of it negatively impairing an individual.

Employers do screen for cannabis though- with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) being the most prevalent in its chemical makeup. Therefore if you use a CBD product containing THC, it is possible to fail a drug test due to residual amounts of THC in the CBD product.

Not all CBD products that are labeled as pure actually eliminate all traces of THC. CBD companies do not always get their products third-party tested, resulting in misrepresentation of the actual amount of THC present. If you are careful to avoid accidental exposure to THC by consuming CBD products, then you most likely will not fail a drug screening for CBD usage.

POSTS
GUIDE
FAQ

Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It’s how we think, feel, and act as we cope with life. It determines how we handle stress, relate to each other, and make choices.

Mental illnesses are health conditions that impact a person’s thoughts, emotions, relationships, and daily functioning. Commonly mental illness is related to trauma, distress, grief, or sadness. There is a wide variety of diagnoses with varying degrees of effects on certain areas of life.

According to the National Assocation on Mental Illness (NAMI):

• 20.6% of U.S. adults experienced mental illness in 2019 (51.5 million people). This represents 1 in 5 adults.

• 5.2% of U.S. adults experienced serious mental illness in 2019 (13.1 million people). This represents 1 in 20 adults.

• 16.5% of U.S. youth aged 6-17 experienced a mental health disorder in 2016 (7.7 million people)

Mental illness does not discriminate and can affect anyone regardless of gender, age, income, social status, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation or background.

There is not one particular known cause for mental illness. Research suggests a variety of causes including the following causes:

• genetic

• biological

• psychosocial

• environmental

There are many warning signs and symptoms associated with mental illness. Here are some general red flags to watch and listen for:

• avoiding friends and family

• changes in eating or sleeping habits

• inability to complete daily responsibilities

• feeling tired and low energy

• extreme mood changes

• lengthy bouts of sadness or irritability

• excessive fear, worrying or anxiety

• strong feelings of anger

• confused thinking

• problems concentrating

• seeing or hearing things that are not really there

• increased drugs / alcohol use

• increased fear of weight gain or concern with appearance

• thoughts of suicide

And for children:

• change in school performance

• frequent temper tantrums

• excessive worrying or anxiety

• hyperactive behavior

• frequent nightmares

• persistent disobedience and/or aggressive behavior

Different mental health diagnoses have different treatment plans- so it is critical to speak with a medical professional. An effective treatment plan may include medication, psychotherapy, and peer support groups- most people can get relief from their symptoms by taking part in this type of treatment plan. With careful monitoring and management of the disorder, it is still possible to live a full, productive life.

POSTS




CANNABIS + MENTAL HEALTH EDUCATION

all science based info all the time

Cannabis

Cannabis

guide
faq

Cannabis otherwise known as marijuana, weed, pot, grass, and more is part of the Cannabaceae plant family that is used for medicinal purposes or as a recreational drug. The cannabis stavita L plant originated in the Himalayas, and include three different subspecies: cannabis staiva is tall and thin, cannabis indica is short and bushy, and cannabis ruderalis short and stalky. The effects of the chemical compounds used to be fairly consistant by subspecies. However with genetic engineering over the years this no longer hold up. Cannabis yields a wide variety of colorful crystalized buds. It als has a pungent aromas- sometimes fruity and other time skunky scented. Cannabis contain over 500 chemical compounds are are proving to balance out each other and you, too.

The short answer- Yes! Absolutely! However cannabis is still classified as a Schedule I controlled substance under the Control Substance Act- categoring it as having “no currently accepted medical use in the United States, a lack of accepted safetyfor use under medical supervision, and a hugh potential for abuse.”

Despite this, there is evidence that supports cannabis used as a medicine. The National Institute on Drug Abuse notes various methods in which cannabis can be employed to help certain health related implications. FDA has also approved the pharmceutical drug Epidiolex which is the first drug comprised of cannabidiol- an active ingredient derived from cannabis to treat epilepsy in children.

It can be! There do exist risks for overuse and abuse of cannabis, and the potential to become addicted or dependent on it. However, this does not mean that anyone and everyone who touches cannabis will become addicted to it. In fact, there are quite a variety of factors that contribute to the reasons people get hooked on cannabis and cannot seem to stop, even if it interferes with daily activities or needs. Genetics, age, co-occuring disorders, trauma, family and social support are contributing factors that might determine underlying causes of addiction to cannabis.

According to the official CDC website, it is very unlikely to have a fatal overdose when using cannabis. However, just because an overdose is unlikely to happen, does not mean it is completely harmless. Responsible use is a very important factor and there are risks associated with cannabis use. Some side effects of using too much can include: anxiety, confusion, paranoia, accelerated heartbeat, hallucinations and potential nausea and vomiting.

This question can also be asked as “is cannabis a gateway drug?”, and the answer is not as simple as you may think. This cannot be answered with a simple “yes” or an easy “no”, because you first must look at and understand the facts presented to you.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the majority of people who use cannabis and only cannabis usually do not go on to take other forms of drugs, or ones that may be deemed “harder” substances. Those who do go on to take “harder” substances may show that their cannabis use preceded other drug usage. This may be explained by the hypothesis that people who are more vulnerable to using illicit substances may start with drugs that are readily available, such as cannabis, nicotine, and alcohol. As social interactions and usage history changes, one’s drug of choice may also alter.

Due to this, it is important to take into consideration one’s biological makeup and genetic history. You should ask yourself whether there is a history of drug usage in the family, as well as other biological factors that may come into play.

There is limited research on whether withdrawal symptoms are present in patients utilizing medical cannabis. One study concluded that 47% of people experience withdrawal symptoms from cannabis use.

Researchers continue to debate the potential for negative medicating cycles- meaning withdrawal symptoms present similarly to mental health symptoms. Therefore patients often misinterpreted their experience of withdrawal – believing it’s anxiety or depression. It may be common that patients then treat their perceived mental health- that’s actually withdrawal- with more cannabis.

Symptoms of withdrawal may include:

• aggression

• anger

• irritability

• sleep disturbance

• changes in appetite

• depressed mood

• restlessness

• headaches

• vomiting

• abdominal pain

Be sure to consult with your prescribing doctor if you have any concerns for your withdrawal and mental health symptoms.

posts
CBD

CBD

guide
faq

CBD is a naturally occuring chemical compound in all Cannabis Sativa L plants- which includes cannabis and hemp. While products and results vary, there has been a growing interest in this chemcial compound as many users report a greater sense of calmness, decreased appeitite, improved sleep, and more…

A major misconception about CBD is that it is legal in all 50 states- this is not true. CBD is legal federally but each state can make their own laws regarding CBD. CBD legalization laws vary state by state. CBD remains completely illegal in the following states: Idaho, Nebraska, and South Dakota. Be sure to check the laws in your state.

CBD is not intoxicating. However it is psychoactive and psychotropic; it causes changes in an individual’s thoughts and behavior as well as alters brain function temporarily. When used properly, it does not get you high.

CBD interacts with the body’s endocannabinoid system- helping us to help us maintain homeostasis or balance. CBD affects the body’s endocannabinoid receptors, causing the body to use more of its own naturally produced endocannabinoids to find physiological equilibrium.

There are four types of CBD you will find on the market including:

• full spectrum – includes all cannabinoid present in cannabis and hemp plants.

• broad spectrum – contains all the elements of the plant EXCEPT delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

• isolate – is only CBD that has been isolated or separated from all the other cannabinoids

• terpsolate – is CBD mixed with a terpene.

These distinctions are important based on intended use regarding the treatment of certain conditions and drug testing.

Workplace drug screening tests are very common nowadays, and is usually tested through a urine sample. Employers typically are looking for drugs that are reported to impair judgement or motor skills, such as amphetamines and opiates. CBD in itself is not one of the chemicals that employers are testing for, as there are no reports of it negatively impairing an individual.

Employers do screen for cannabis though- with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) being the most prevalent in its chemical makeup. Therefore if you use a CBD product containing THC, it is possible to fail a drug test due to residual amounts of THC in the CBD product.

Not all CBD products that are labeled as pure actually eliminate all traces of THC. CBD companies do not always get their products third-party tested, resulting in misrepresentation of the actual amount of THC present. If you are careful to avoid accidental exposure to THC by consuming CBD products, then you most likely will not fail a drug screening for CBD usage.

posts
qualifying conditions
Brain

Mental Health

guide
faq

Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It’s how we think, feel, and act as we cope with life. It determines how we handle stress, relate to each other, and make choices.

Mental illnesses are health conditions that impact a person’s thoughts, emotions, relationships, and daily functioning. Commonly mental illness is related to trauma, distress, grief, or sadness. There is a wide variety of diagnoses with varying degrees of effects on certain areas of life.

According to the National Assocation on Mental Illness (NAMI):

• 20.6% of U.S. adults experienced mental illness in 2019 (51.5 million people). This represents 1 in 5 adults.

• 5.2% of U.S. adults experienced serious mental illness in 2019 (13.1 million people). This represents 1 in 20 adults.

• 16.5% of U.S. youth aged 6-17 experienced a mental health disorder in 2016 (7.7 million people)

Mental illness does not discriminate and can affect anyone regardless of gender, age, income, social status, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation or background.

There is not one particular known cause for mental illness. Research suggests a variety of causes including the following causes:

• genetic

• biological

• psychosocial

• environmental

There are many warning signs and symptoms associated with mental illness. Here are some general red flags to watch and listen for:

• avoiding friends and family

• changes in eating or sleeping habits

• inability to complete daily responsibilities

• feeling tired and low energy

• extreme mood changes

• lengthy bouts of sadness or irritability

• excessive fear, worrying or anxiety

• strong feelings of anger

• confused thinking

• problems concentrating

• seeing or hearing things that are not really there

• increased drugs / alcohol use

• increased fear of weight gain or concern with appearance

• thoughts of suicide

And for children:

• change in school performance

• frequent temper tantrums

• excessive worrying or anxiety

• hyperactive behavior

• frequent nightmares

• persistent disobedience and/or aggressive behavior

Different mental health diagnoses have different treatment plans- so it is critical to speak with a medical professional. An effective treatment plan may include medication, psychotherapy, and peer support groups- most people can get relief from their symptoms by taking part in this type of treatment plan. With careful monitoring and management of the disorder, it is still possible to live a full, productive life.

posts