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Cannabis
CANNABIS FAQ

Cannabis otherwise known as marijuana, weed, pot, grass, and more is part of the Cannabaceae plant family that is used for medicinal purposes or as a recreational drug. The cannabis stavita L plant originated in the Himalayas, and include three different subspecies: cannabis staiva is tall and thin, cannabis indica is short and bushy, and cannabis ruderalis short and stalky. The effects of the chemical compounds used to be fairly consistant by subspecies. However with genetic engineering over the years this no longer hold up. Cannabis yields a wide variety of colorful crystalized buds. It als has a pungent aromas- sometimes fruity and other time skunky scented. Cannabis contain over 500 chemical compounds are are proving to balance out each other and you, too.

No, you don’t have to smoke it. These days there are a great many routes of administration to use cannabis. It can also be ingested by swallowing a pill or absorbed a tincture under your tongue, applied topically to the skin in a cream or transdermal patch, and more. Each delivery method offers its own advantages and drawbacks, and should be carefully considered for medical use.

The short answer- Yes! Absolutely! However cannabis is still classified as a Schedule I controlled substance under the Control Substance Act- categoring it as having “no currently accepted medical use in the United States, a lack of accepted safetyfor use under medical supervision, and a hugh potential for abuse.”

Despite this, there is evidence that supports cannabis used as a medicine. The National Institute on Drug Abuse notes various methods in which cannabis can be employed to help certain health related implications. FDA has also approved the pharmceutical drug Epidiolex which is the first drug comprised of cannabidiol- an active ingredient derived from cannabis to treat epilepsy in children.

The short answer- Yes! Absolutely! However cannabis is still classified as a Schedule I controlled substance under the Control Substance Act- categoring it as having “no currently accepted medical use in the United States, a lack of accepted safetyfor use under medical supervision, and a hugh potential for abuse.” Despite this, there is evidence that supports cannabis used as a medicine. The National Institute on Drug Abuse notes various methods in which cannabis can be employed to help certain health related implications. FDA has also approved the pharmceutical drug Epidiolex which is the first drug comprised of cannabidiol- an active ingredient derived from cannabis to treat epilepsy in children.

There are possible health risks to be aware of if consdiering using cannabis. The following are some risks worth considering:
• cardovanscular risks associated with THC use
• pulmonary risks of smoking cannabis
• risks of driving under the influence wiht THC use
• pregnancy and breastfeeding with THC use
• risk of THC use in pediatric populations
• risk of drug-drug interactions when combining cannabis with other medications

Mental health risks also include:
• family history psychosis, mood disorders and/or addiction

It is always best to consult your medical or mental health professional prior to using cannabis.

According to the official CDC website, it is very unlikely to have a fatal overdose when using cannabis. However, just because an overdose is unlikely to happen, does not mean it is completely harmless. Responsible use is a very important factor and there are risks associated with cannabis use. Some side effects of using too much can include: anxiety, confusion, paranoia, accelerated heartbeat, hallucinations and potential nausea and vomiting.

This question can also be asked as “is cannabis a gateway drug?”, and the answer is not as simple as you may think. This cannot be answered with a simple “yes” or an easy “no”, because you first must look at and understand the facts presented to you.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the majority of people who use cannabis and only cannabis usually do not go on to take other forms of drugs, or ones that may be deemed “harder” substances. Those who do go on to take “harder” substances may show that their cannabis use preceded other drug usage. This may be explained by the hypothesis that people who are more vulnerable to using illicit substances may start with drugs that are readily available, such as cannabis, nicotine, and alcohol. As social interactions and usage history changes, one’s drug of choice may also alter.

Due to this, it is important to take into consideration one’s biological makeup and genetic history. You should ask yourself whether there is a history of drug usage in the family, as well as other biological factors that may come into play.

Welp, let’s start by saying the use of classification of cannabis cultivars and strains as sativa, indica, and hybrid is more about marketing and less about their effects. This is what they are supposed to mean:

• Sativa strains are thought to produce more cerebral effects often called a “mind” or “head” high. These strain are said to help you feel euphoric, energetic, and creative, perfect for social and daytime activities. Although this strain is commonly recommended for its effects during the day, they may also be useful at night for an exciting night life.

• Indica strains are thought to produce effects felt in the body commonly called a “body” high. This strains’ effects are often described as calming, soothing, and relaxing, perfect for winding down after a long day. Indica strains are siad to be ideal for spending the day or night relaxing giving a heavy feeling of sitting back to relax.

• Hybrid Strains have the ability to cross both sides of the two strains. These types of strains are a blend of both Sativa and Indica all in one! Typically you would want to ask your budtender or check the content of the strain to see if it leans more towards Sativa or Indica for their desired effects.

Since implimenting this categorical system, the differences in observed effects in cannabis are more likely due to their cannabiniod and terpene profiles.

Some legal states offer the opportunity to use cannabis in lounges and at events. Most states require that you use in the privacy of your own home or other private residences. Dont’ forget to mind your manners- open your apartment window, use air freshner, and light some incense or a candle!

Cannabis has been a popular form of holistic medicine dating back thousands of years. However there is a gap in modern assess of its efficacy due to it’s legal status. Despite negative, stigmatized connotations instigated by lack of educational resources, it is crucial to acknowledge the overall benefits as more research and ancedotal information is compiled.

Cannabis is proving to be beneficial for a variety of ailments. Most commonly, consumers use medical cannabis for severe, long term pain, nausea, and uncontrollable muscle spasms. Cannabis is thought to be efficacious for the symptom reduction of the following physical conditions:
• Glaucoma symptoms
• HIV/AIDS
• Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS – “Lou Gehrig’s disease”)
• Parkinson’s
• Huntington
• Alzheimer’s disease
• Epilepsy
• Tourette’s Syndrome
• Chronic Pain
• Inflammatory Bowel disease

Additionally, cannabis is thought to be effective alleviating mental health symptoms as well. However due to its legal status and stigma, few systemic studies have been performed to quantify the impact of cannabis on mental health. Anecdotal accounts outline that cannabis helps manage anxiety, decrease opioid consumption, and may aid in recovery.

The qualifications for a medical cannabis card depend on where you live. Each individual state has their own medical cannabis policies, procedure, and approved medical conditions. Most states award medical cannabis cards to:
• adults
• minors with medical necessity
• caregivers

It depends on a number of factors including the cannabis form, how often you use cannabis, metabolism, and what kind of drug test is being performed. In general, when a person is being tested for cannabis, the test is usually looking for a presence of THC in the body. There are 4 different types of drug tests that have different detection times. The tests with the shortest detection times are saliva and blood drug tests, as THC only stays in saliva for an estimated 1-3 days for occasional users and 1-29 days for chronic users. THC only stays in the bloodstream for an estimated 24-48 hours. The next type of drug test is a urine test, which can detect THC for up to 30+ days depending on usage. If you are an occasional user (up to 3 times a week) then the estimated time that THC will stay in your urine is 3 days. If you are a moderate user (4 times a week), the estimated time that THC will be detectable in your urine is 5-7 days. If you are a chronic user (daily) then the estimated time that THC will be detectable in your urine is 10-15 days. If you are a chronic heavy user (multiple times a day) then the estimated time that THC will be detectable in your urine is 30+days. The last type of drug test is a hair follicle test which detects THC up to 90 days after use, as they collect 1.5 inches of hair from the follicle and hair usually grows ½ inch a month.

No, cannabis does not directly make you lazy. If you find yourself being lazy when you use cannabis, it is likely that you are lazy all of the time, even when you are not using it. In fact, many people find themselves even more motivated and creative when they use cannabis. Different strains will have a different effect on everyone, making some feel tired or relaxed, and some feel energized and euphoric, but cannabis itself will not make you a lazy person. 

Despite what you may think- it is very possible to overdose or overconsume cannabis. Symptoms of overconsumption include:
• escalated heart rate
• headache
• pale skin
• paranoid thoughts or hallucinations
• confusion or panic attacks

Nope, not death. Fatal overdose is not associated with cannabis use. No one has ever died from an overdose of cannabis. Research has shown that a toxic dosage of cannabis has never been found in a person’s system.

People have died from unsafe actions they participated in while being high, but never directly from the intake of cannabis. For example- cannabis related car accidents have increased in cannabis legal states.

The process for getting a Medical Cannabis card varies by state. However, there are some general steps regardless of your home state including:
• be prepared to show proof that you are a resident of that state
• acquire documentation of yoru qualifying condition from your treating doctor
• find a doctor to certifing your qualifying health condition and enroll you in your state medical cannabis program
• submit your application and fee to your state For more information, search for your state medical cannabis board website.

There is limited research on whether withdrawal symptoms are present in patients utilizing medical cannabis. One study concluded that 47% of people experience withdrawal symptoms from cannabis use.

The researchers continue to debate the potential for negative medicating cycles- meaning withdrawal symptoms present similarly to mental health symptoms. Therefore patients often misinterpreted their experience of withdrawal – believing it’s anxiety or depression. It may be common that patients then treat their perceived mental health- that’s actually withdrawal- with more cannabis.

Symptoms of withdrawal may include:
• aggression
• anger
• irritability
• anxiety
• insomnia
• anorexia
• depression
• restlessness
• headaches
• vomiting
• abdominal pain

Be sure to consult with your prescribing doctor if you have any concerns for your withdrawal and mental health symptoms.

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